Sewer Line Cleaning Repair in Southbury CT

Southbury CT 06488

WE DO IT ALL – Sewer & Drain Rodding Clean, Repair, Replace, Install

Offering complete underground plumbing services in Southbury CT and will access your sewer lines and evaluate the problem before attempting to make any repairs. With a FREE ONSITE ESTIMATE, you’ll know exactly what your sewer repair & backup service will cost before any repairs are started. You will be advised on ways to avoid trying to fix your sewer lines yourself because a number of things could go wrong and make the problem worse. You might also be surprised how quickly and efficiently the expert plumbers work to get your sewer lines working properly.

FREE ONSITE ESTIMATES

Clogged drain and sewer lines cleared of all blockages. We clear every blockage. High Pressure water jet cleaning in Southbury to keep drain and sewer lines free longer.

Video: Cheaper Than Dirt Sewer Repair Pt 3

Video: Under Slab Sewer Pipe Replacement

6 Signals you might have a Sewer Problem in Southbury CT:

  • Bad odor coming out from floor drains
  • Backed up / Clogged Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Bathtubs
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Gurgling Toilet
  • Basement Flooding
  • Toilet paper appearing near downspouts

Common Southbury Sewer Problems:

  • Trees roots grow into main sewer lines
  • Accumulation of Kitchen Grease / Oil being put down the drain
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Feminine Hygiene Product Clogs
  • Pipes Collapsing or Settling
  • Underground Gas / Water Construction

We Do it All!

  • Drain Rootering / Rodding
  • Sewer Rodding
  • Catch Basin Pumping
  • Drain Repair
  • Grease Trap Pumping
  • Hydro Jetting Service – High Pressure Water
  • Power Rodding
  • Video Camera Inspection
  • Preventative Maintenance
Southbury Sewer Repair Services

Southbury, Connecticut

Southbury comprises sprawling rural country areas, suburban neighborhoods, and historic districts. It is a short distance from major business and commercial centers, and is within 80 miles (130 km) of New York City and 40 miles (64 km) of Hartford; the latter the capital of Connecticut.

The town of Southbury was one of several towns formed out of a parcel of land purchased from the Paugussett Indians in 1659. Southbury was originally part of Woodbury, which was settled in 1673. A meetinghouse for the Southbury Ecclesiastical Society was built in 1733, and in 1845 the town of Southbury was incorporated.[2] Although incorporated as part of Litchfield County, Southbury has been in New Haven County for most of its existence.[3]

In the 1800s, water power became essential to the growth of Southbury's industries, which included mills, tanneries, and distilleries.[4] The power for these industries came primarily from the Pomperaug River[5] and the Housatonic River. As the industrial revolution progressed, many of these businesses left for Waterbury.

In the 1920s, Russian expatriates Count Ilya Tolstoy (son of author Leo Tolstoy) and George Grebentschikoff founded an artists' colony at one end of Main Street, known as Churaevka (or "Russian Village"). At its peak, Churaevka had a printing press used by Russian and Ukrainian scholars and novelists. Visitors to the colony included the composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. Most of its immigrant population is now gone; however, St. Sergius Chapel, designed by Nicholas Roerich and built in 1932-1933, remains. Churaevka is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

In November 1937 residents of the farming outpost got word that a man by the name of Wolfgang Jung had purchased 178 acres (0.72 km2) in the town. Residents looking into his plans discovered that he was a member of the German American Bund, an organization of ethnic Germans living in the United States who supported Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. Its leader, Fritz Kuhn, was considered the leading anti-Semite in the country. Word soon got out that they were in fact planning to build their largest training facility in the country. Residents objected by calling a town meeting and set up a zoning department with one simple rule, no military activity excluding the United States Army. The law was adopted December 14 and the Bund stopped work and eventually sold the land.[6] In 2012 a documentary was created entitled 'Home of the Brave: When Southbury Said No to the Nazi s'