Sewer Line Cleaning Repair in Palatka FL

Palatka FL 32177

WE DO IT ALL – Sewer & Drain Rodding Clean, Repair, Replace, Install

Offering complete underground plumbing services in Palatka FL and will access your sewer lines and evaluate the problem before attempting to make any repairs. With a FREE ONSITE ESTIMATE, you’ll know exactly what your sewer repair & backup service will cost before any repairs are started. You will be advised on ways to avoid trying to fix your sewer lines yourself because a number of things could go wrong and make the problem worse. You might also be surprised how quickly and efficiently the expert plumbers work to get your sewer lines working properly.

FREE ONSITE ESTIMATES

Clogged drain and sewer lines cleared of all blockages. We clear every blockage. High Pressure water jet cleaning in Palatka to keep drain and sewer lines free longer.

Video: Repair the Cast Iron Sewer Line Pipe Under The Toilet Patch A Hole In The Drain Line

Video: San Leandro Sewer Line Repair |Sewer Line Replacement in San Leandro

6 Signals you might have a Sewer Problem in Palatka FL:

  • Bad odor coming out from floor drains
  • Backed up / Clogged Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Bathtubs
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Gurgling Toilet
  • Basement Flooding
  • Toilet paper appearing near downspouts

Common Palatka Sewer Problems:

  • Trees roots grow into main sewer lines
  • Accumulation of Kitchen Grease / Oil being put down the drain
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Feminine Hygiene Product Clogs
  • Pipes Collapsing or Settling
  • Underground Gas / Water Construction

We Do it All!

  • Drain Rootering / Rodding
  • Sewer Rodding
  • Catch Basin Pumping
  • Drain Repair
  • Grease Trap Pumping
  • Hydro Jetting Service – High Pressure Water
  • Power Rodding
  • Video Camera Inspection
  • Preventative Maintenance
Palatka Sewer Repair Services

Palatka, Florida

Palatka (pronounced puh-lat-kuh) is a city in Putnam County, Florida, United States. The population was 10,558 at the 2010 census.[5] It is the county seat of Putnam County.[6] Palatka is the principal city of the Palatka Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is home to 72,893 residents. The city is also home to St. Johns River State College, St. Johns River Water Management District Headquarters, and Ravine Gardens State Park. The area is well known for its local festivals, most notably the Florida Azalea Festival and the Blue Crab Festival.

The area was once the domain of the Timucuan peoples, two tribes of which existed in the Palatka region under chiefs Saturiwa and Utina. They fished bass and mullet, or hunted deer, turkeys, bear and opossum. Others farmed beans, corn, melons, squash, and tobacco. However, infectious disease that came with European contact and war devastated the tribes, and they were extinct by the mid-18th century. The last people evacuated with the Spanish to Cuba in 1763, when Spain ceded Florida to Great Britain after the Seven Years' War.

During the late eighteenth century, remnants of Creek and other tribes made their way to Florida. In a process of ethnogenesis, the Seminole tribe was formed. They called the location Pilo-taikita, meaning "crossing over" or "cows' crossing". Here the St. Johns River narrows and begins a shallower, winding course upstream to Lake George and Lake Monroe.

In 1767, Denys Rolle (1725–1797), an English gentleman and philanthropist, established Rollestown on the east bank of the St. Johns River at the head of deep-water navigation. His 78,000-acre (320 km2) plantation was a utopian commercial and humanitarian experiment, recruiting settlers off the streets of London, including paupers, vagrants, pickpockets and "penitent prostitutes." Two hundred indentured servants arrived to clear wilderness for agriculture and livestock. Unaccustomed to either hard work or a subtropical climate, however, they scattered. Rolle next purchased slaves from West Africa, forcing them to tend chickens, hogs, goats and sheep, or produce cotton, indigo, citrus and turpentine for export to England.

He built a mansion and laid out a village, but trouble beleaguered the "ideal society." In 1770, a disgruntled overseer sold over 1,000 of his employer's cattle and disappeared with the money. Rolle hired new overseers and bought more slaves, but the plantation failed to prosper. When Spain resumed control of Florida in 1783, Rolle abandoned the colony and chartered a ship to carry his household belongings, livestock and slaves to a 2,000-acre (8.1 km2) estate on Great Exuma in the Bahamas. The point, in East Palatka, is still called Rollestown.