Sewer Line Cleaning Repair in Kalamazoo MI

Kalamazoo MI 49001

WE DO IT ALL – Sewer & Drain Rodding Clean, Repair, Replace, Install

Offering complete underground plumbing services in Kalamazoo MI and will access your sewer lines and evaluate the problem before attempting to make any repairs. With a FREE ONSITE ESTIMATE, you’ll know exactly what your sewer repair & backup service will cost before any repairs are started. You will be advised on ways to avoid trying to fix your sewer lines yourself because a number of things could go wrong and make the problem worse. You might also be surprised how quickly and efficiently the expert plumbers work to get your sewer lines working properly.


Clogged drain and sewer lines cleared of all blockages. We clear every blockage. High Pressure water jet cleaning in Kalamazoo to keep drain and sewer lines free longer.

6 Signals you might have a Sewer Problem in Kalamazoo MI:

  • Bad odor coming out from floor drains
  • Backed up / Clogged Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Bathtubs
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Gurgling Toilet
  • Basement Flooding
  • Toilet paper appearing near downspouts

Common Kalamazoo Sewer Problems:

  • Trees roots grow into main sewer lines
  • Accumulation of Kitchen Grease / Oil being put down the drain
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Feminine Hygiene Product Clogs
  • Pipes Collapsing or Settling
  • Underground Gas / Water Construction

We Do it All!

  • Drain Rootering / Rodding
  • Sewer Rodding
  • Catch Basin Pumping
  • Drain Repair
  • Grease Trap Pumping
  • Hydro Jetting Service – High Pressure Water
  • Power Rodding
  • Video Camera Inspection
  • Preventative Maintenance
Kalamazoo Sewer Repair Services

Kalamazoo, Michigan

Kalamazoo /ˌkæləməˈzuː/ is a city in the southwest region of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is the county seat of Kalamazoo County. As of the 2010 census, Kalamazoo had a total population of 74,262. Kalamazoo is the major city of the Kalamazoo-Portage Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 335,340 as of 2015.[6] Kalamazoo is equidistant from the major American cities of Chicago and Detroit, each less than 150 miles away.

One of Kalamazoo's most notable features is the Kalamazoo Mall, an outdoor pedestrian shopping mall. The city created the mall in 1959 by closing part of Burdick Street to auto traffic, although two of the mall's four blocks have been reopened to auto traffic since 1999.[7][8] Kalamazoo is home to Western Michigan University, a large public university, Kalamazoo College, a private liberal arts college, and Kalamazoo Valley Community College, a two-year community college.

Originally known as Bronson (after founder Titus Bronson) in the township of Arcadia, the names of both the city and the township were changed to "Kalamazoo" in 1836 and 1837, respectively.[9] The Kalamazoo name comes from a Potawatomi word, first found in a British report in 1772. However, the Kalamazoo River, which passes through the modern city of Kalamazoo, was located on the route between Detroit and Fort Saint-Joseph (nowadays Niles, Michigan). French-Canadian traders, missionaries, and military personnel were quite familiar with this area during the French era and thereafter. The name for the Kalamazoo River was then known by Canadians and French as La rivière Kikanamaso. The name "Kikanamaso" was also recorded by Father Pierre Potier, a Jesuit missionary for the Huron-Wendats at the Assumption mission (south shore of Detroit), while en route to Fort Saint-Joseph during the fall of 1760.[10] Legend has it that "Ki-ka-ma-sung," meaning "boiling water," referring to a footrace held each fall by local Native Americans, who had to run to the river and back before the pot boiled.[11] Still another theory is that it means "the mirage or reflecting river."[12] Another legend is that the image of "boiling water" referred to fog on the river as seen from the hills above the current downtown. The name was also given to the river that flows almost all the way across the state.

The name Kalamazoo, which sounds unusual to English-speaking ears, has become a metonym for exotic places, as in the phrase "from Timbuktu to Kalamazoo."[13] Today, T-shirts are sold in Kalamazoo with the phrase "Yes, there really is a Kalamazoo."[14]

The area on which the modern city of Kalamazoo stands was once home to Native Americans of the Hopewell culture, who migrated into the area sometime before the first millennium. Evidence of their early residency remains in the form of a small mound in downtown's Bronson Park. The Hopewell civilization began to decline after the 8th century and was replaced by other groups.[15] The Potawatomi culture lived in the area when the first European explorers arrived.