Sewer Line Cleaning Repair in Convent LA

Convent LA 70723

WE DO IT ALL – Sewer & Drain Rodding Clean, Repair, Replace, Install

Offering complete underground plumbing services in Convent LA and will access your sewer lines and evaluate the problem before attempting to make any repairs. With a FREE ONSITE ESTIMATE, you’ll know exactly what your sewer repair & backup service will cost before any repairs are started. You will be advised on ways to avoid trying to fix your sewer lines yourself because a number of things could go wrong and make the problem worse. You might also be surprised how quickly and efficiently the expert plumbers work to get your sewer lines working properly.


Clogged drain and sewer lines cleared of all blockages. We clear every blockage. High Pressure water jet cleaning in Convent to keep drain and sewer lines free longer.

6 Signals you might have a Sewer Problem in Convent LA:

  • Bad odor coming out from floor drains
  • Backed up / Clogged Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Bathtubs
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Gurgling Toilet
  • Basement Flooding
  • Toilet paper appearing near downspouts

Common Convent Sewer Problems:

  • Trees roots grow into main sewer lines
  • Accumulation of Kitchen Grease / Oil being put down the drain
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Feminine Hygiene Product Clogs
  • Pipes Collapsing or Settling
  • Underground Gas / Water Construction

We Do it All!

  • Drain Rootering / Rodding
  • Sewer Rodding
  • Catch Basin Pumping
  • Drain Repair
  • Grease Trap Pumping
  • Hydro Jetting Service – High Pressure Water
  • Power Rodding
  • Video Camera Inspection
  • Preventative Maintenance
Convent Sewer Repair Services

Sainte Marie de La Tourette

Sainte Marie de La Tourette is a Dominican Order priory on a hillside near Lyon, France designed by architects Le Corbusier and Iannis Xenakis and constructed between 1956 and 1960. Le Corbusier's design of the building began in May, 1953 with sketches drawn at L'Arbresle, France outlining the basic shape of the building and terrain of the site.[1] La Tourette is considered one of the most important buildings of the late Modernist style.

The building contains a hundred bedrooms for teachers and students as well as study halls, a hall for work and one for relaxation, a library and a refectory. There is also a church, where the friars worship and pray, which connects all the parts (the achievement of the traditional cloister form is rendered impossible here by the slope of terrain). On two levels, the loggias crowning the building (one for each acoustically isolated monk's cell) form brises-soleil. The study halls, work and relaxation halls, as well as the library occupy the upper-level. Below is the refectory and the cloister in the form of a cross leading to the church. And then come the piles carrying the four convent buildings rising from the slope of the terrain left in its original condition, without terracing.

The structural frame is of rough reinforced concrete. The panes of glass located on the three exterior faces, the so-called "pans de verre ondulatoire" ("undulating glass surfaces"), were designed by Xenakis, and are similar to those of the Secretariat at Chandigarh on which Xenakis also worked. On the other hand, in the garden-court of the cloister, the fenestration is composed of large concrete elements reaching from floor to ceiling, perforated with glazed voids and separated from one another by "ventilators": vertical slits covered by metal mosquito netting and furnished with a pivoting shutter. The corridors leading to the dwelling cells are lit by a horizontal opening located under the ceiling.

At La Tourette many aspects of Corbusier's developed architectural vocabulary are visible – the vertical brise-soleils used with effect in India, light-cannons piercing solid masonry walls, and window-openings separated by Modulor-controlled vertical divisions. In contrast with Ronchamp, the building does not crown and complement the site, but instead dominates the landscape composition.

If there is harmony, it is in the finishes that in their roughness and near-brutality betray some empathy with the life of a friar. La Tourette makes no claim to the effete bourgeois lifestyle embodied at the Villa Savoye; its antecedents, if anything, are the Greek monasteries of Mount Athos and an almost mythological history.