Sewer Line Cleaning Repair in Burlington IA

Burlington IA 52601

WE DO IT ALL – Sewer & Drain Rodding Clean, Repair, Replace, Install

Offering complete underground plumbing services in Burlington IA and will access your sewer lines and evaluate the problem before attempting to make any repairs. With a FREE ONSITE ESTIMATE, you’ll know exactly what your sewer repair & backup service will cost before any repairs are started. You will be advised on ways to avoid trying to fix your sewer lines yourself because a number of things could go wrong and make the problem worse. You might also be surprised how quickly and efficiently the expert plumbers work to get your sewer lines working properly.

FREE ONSITE ESTIMATES

Clogged drain and sewer lines cleared of all blockages. We clear every blockage. High Pressure water jet cleaning in Burlington to keep drain and sewer lines free longer.

Video: Cost to replace sewer line under house

Video: Affordable Trenchless & Pipe Lining Video -Sewer line repair

6 Signals you might have a Sewer Problem in Burlington IA:

  • Bad odor coming out from floor drains
  • Backed up / Clogged Toilets, Sinks, Showers, Bathtubs
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Gurgling Toilet
  • Basement Flooding
  • Toilet paper appearing near downspouts

Common Burlington Sewer Problems:

  • Trees roots grow into main sewer lines
  • Accumulation of Kitchen Grease / Oil being put down the drain
  • Overflowing Toilets
  • Feminine Hygiene Product Clogs
  • Pipes Collapsing or Settling
  • Underground Gas / Water Construction

We Do it All!

  • Drain Rootering / Rodding
  • Sewer Rodding
  • Catch Basin Pumping
  • Drain Repair
  • Grease Trap Pumping
  • Hydro Jetting Service – High Pressure Water
  • Power Rodding
  • Video Camera Inspection
  • Preventative Maintenance
Burlington Sewer Repair Services

Burlington, Iowa

Burlington is a city and the county seat of Des Moines County, Iowa, United States.[4] The population was 25,663 in the 2010 census, a decline from the 26,839 population in the 2000 census.[5][6] Burlington is the center of a micropolitan area including West Burlington, Iowa, and Middletown, Iowa, and Gulfport, Illinois. Burlington is the home of Snake Alley, once labelled the crookedest alley in the world.

In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson organized two parties of explorers to map the Louisiana Purchase. The Lewis and Clark Expedition followed the Missouri River, while Lt. Zebulon Pike followed the Mississippi River. In 1805, Pike landed at the bluffs below Burlington and raised the United States Flag for the first time on what would become Iowa soil and recommended construction of a fort. The recommendation went unheeded.

The American Fur Company of John Jacob Astor established a post in the area in 1829. Settlement began in 1833, shortly after the Black Hawk Purchase, when Samuel (aka Simpson) White, Amzi Doolitle, and Morton M. McCarver crossed the Mississippi River from Big Island and staked claims there.[8][9][10] According to an account A.T. Andreas wrote in 1875,[citation needed] White erected a cabin in the area later platted to be Front Street between Court and High streets. Andreas called White and Doolittle the Romulus and Remus of their settlement, referring to the mythic heroes who founded Rome, a city surrounded by hills. A few weeks later, William R. Ross joined them and established a general store. In November and December, he surveyed the settlement for White and Doolittle.[11]:145

In the spring of 1834 they allowed John Gray, who purchased the first lot with his wife Eliza Jane, to rename the town for $50. Gray chose to name it Burlington in honor of his hometown in Vermont.[12] The Grays' daughter Abigail was born in Burlington that same year, the first American settler child born on Iowa soil.[a][citation needed]

In 1837, Burlington was designated the second territorial capital of the Wisconsin Territory.[13] The Iowa Territory was organized in the following year, and Burlington was named as its first territorial capital.[14] The government used "Old Zion," the first Methodist Church in Iowa (located near what is now Third and Washington streets), to conduct its business. A historical marker commemorates the site of the church and early territorial government.